10 Surprising Causes of Plaque Buildup: What You Need to Know

Surprising Causes

and Health

Having plaque buildup in your cardiovascular system can be incredibly dangerous, as it can lead to strokes, heart attacks, and other coronary diseases. It’s essential that we learn what the causes of plaque buildup are to help prevent serious medical issues from occurring.

Unfortunately, many of the causes of plaque buildup are not immediately obvious. In addition to smoking and poor diet, which are known to be some of the major causes, there are also other surprises that can cause plaque buildup.

1. Inactivity

It shouldn’t come as too much of a surprise that a sedentary lifestyle can lead to plaque buildup over time. Physical activity helps to increase blood flow throughout the body and reduce plaque, while being inactive creates the opposite effect of plaque buildup. Strive to be physically active all the days of the week to reduce the risk of plaque buildup.

2. Stress

The effects of stress on the body can be incredibly damaging, and one of the potential consequences of stress can be an increase of plaque buildup. Results from studies suggest that higher levels of stress can cause inflammation, leading to an increase of plaque buildup in arteries. Finding ways to manage stress and focus on self-care activities can help reduce the risk of plaque buildup from stress.

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3. Poor Oral Hygiene

Oral hygiene is incredibly important for the overall health of your body, and one of the potential outcomes of poor oral hygiene is an increase of plaque buildup. When bacteria that is trapped and accumulate in your mouth migrate down to the artery walls, it can cause inflammation and plaque buildup. Making sure you’re brushing and flossing regularly can help to reduce the risk of plaque buildup.

4. Diabetes

Having diabetes greatly increases the risk of plaque buildup. Diabetic patients are more likely to develop and accumulate plaque due to the high levels of glucose in their bloodstream, leading to higher levels of inflammation in the body. Managing glucose levels can help to control and reduce plaque buildup.

5. High Sodium Intake

Eating too much sodium can cause the body to retain excess amounts of sodium, which can increase blood pressure and the risk of plaque buildup. Eating too much sodium can also cause the body to retain too much water, leading to an increase in inflammation in the body that can in turn lead to an accumulation of plaque.

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6. Alcohol Consumption

Drinking large amounts of alcohol can cause an increase of plaque buildup. Consuming too much alcohol can lead to an increase in dangerous levels of triglycerides, and fatty deposits in the arteries which can eventually cause plaque buildup.

7. Lack of Fiber

Fiber helps to minimize plaque buildup by helping to reduce bad cholesterol in the circulation. When fiber is lacking from the diet, it can increase the risk of plaque buildup. Eating more fiber-rich foods, like vegetables, fruits, nuts, and legumes can help to reduce the risk of plaque buildup.

8. Genetic Factors

Unfortunately, one of the causes of plaque buildup can be linked to genetics. Studies have shown that some genetic factors can put you at a higher risk of developing plaque buildup, such as having a family history of stroke or heart attack. Being aware of your family history can help you monitor the situation and adjust your lifestyle if necessary.

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9. Prescription Medication

Certain prescription medications can increase the risk of plaque buildup. Statins, which are commonly prescribed to reduce cholesterol, can have a negative impact on your cardiovascular health if taken without proper guidance and education. Discussing your medical history and potential risk factors with your doctor can help to determine if these medications are the right fit for you.

10. Low HDL Cholesterol

HDL cholesterol helps the body to remove plaque from the artery walls, but having low levels of HDL cholesterol can lead to an increase of plaque buildup. Eating saturated fats, excessive intake of trans-fats, alcohol consumption, and a number of other factors can all lead to lower levels of HDL cholesterol.

By being aware of the potential causes of plaque buildup, you can help to reduce the risk of developing serious cardiovascular issues. Eating a healthy diet, incorporating physical activity, and understanding the impact of prescription medications can help to minimize the risk of plaque buildup. Overall, it’s important to prioritize your health and keep your body in the best physical condition possible.